Forgiveness in the workplace

—Tonya Ricklefs

With the start of a new year, you hear about new starts and sometimes the importance of forgiveness of old wounds. One area of forgiveness we do not often talk about is forgiveness at work and in your professional life. We sometimes consider “letting go” or moving forwards our personal life, but why would we want to forgive others we work with?

sorry

In an article about workplace forgiveness, Michael Stone summarizes why workplace forgiveness is hard to achieve, the competitive nature of many workplaces does not encourage “letting people off the hook”.  Plus, if you were trying to compete for resources such as raises or other perks, it is hard to forgive when you are trying to achieve a competitive edge. It is hard to let your guard down and feel like you are not “prepared” for what may happen at work from others.

So, how would you go about doing this? In some cases, people will suggest that you go to the person that you want to forgive and let them know you will forgive them.  Sometimes though, going to a co-worker and saying “I forgive you for…” can come across as a bit arrogant and can actually cause more problems in the workplace environment. The other individual may feel they did nothing wrong. According to Psychology Today, the multiple steps of forgiveness are things you do yourself and for yourself. The benefit to doing it for yourself may just lead to you as an individual looking at your work situation differently.

Encouraging forgiveness in the workplace often will increase productivity and team building.  The benefits of encouraging forgiveness in the workplace extend beyond the opportunities for a more cooperative environment.  Forgiving co-workers who you believe have taken advantage of you or harmed you in some way also benefits you as an individual.  People who have forgiven others for “wrongs” usually report a greater sense of happiness or peace.

It is important to note that forgiveness is distinctly different than letting someone walk all over you.  You can forgive someone without allowing him or her to continue to hurt or take advantage of you.   You can choose to not hold onto old grudges or “hurts”, and still try to work with others to improve your work environment together.  Letting go of old frustration will make it easier to negotiate with others to a satisfactory resolution that works everyone at work.  And, if you choose to move onto another work opportunity that works better for you, forgiveness allows you to start over without the baggage that you may bring with your from your other workplace experiences. Here’s to you and a fresh slate for the New Year and those you work with.

References

Mitchell, M. (2013, January 14). 9 steps to forgiveness. Psychology Today http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/heart-and-soul-healing/201301/9-steps-forgiveness

Stone, M. (2002). Forgiveness in the workplace. Industrial and Commercial Training, 34(7), 278-286. Retrieved January 6, 2015, from http://personal.tcu.edu/pwitt/character/Forgiveness/forgiveness in the workplace.pdf

Ethical Considerations in Social Media Research

by Tonya Ricklefs

Last month, I had the opportunity to present a paper on the implications, challenges, and ethics involved in conducting social media research. As a beginning researcher, I was concerned that not enough scientists are having discussions about how to conduct research involving social media and the ethical dilemmas that may be faced when gathering data through Internet-based outlets. When discussing this topic among colleagues, most of the feedback I receive is that the conversations take place at work or in local academic settings. The importance of elevating these conversations to include our national professional organizations was highlighted for me by a recent article published in the magazine Science.

Thumbs up and down symbols

The article notes that social media data is cheap and fast, but fraught with biases and distortion. If this is your first exposure to the discussion about social media research, that notion could inspire you to run the other direction before undertaking research involving online social data. However, if you dig deeper you will find a good discussion on how important it is to acknowledge the possible biases in your data and the limitations of a study. What the article did not point out, however, is that this is true for all research data, regardless of where we obtain it.

Communication, expression, and connection between humans online, through apps, and through shared media have exploded. I believe dismissing research utilizing this data is a bit hasty because there is value in what we could learn. When I log onto Facebook, for example, I am sometimes bombarded by food pictures and recipes. These often come from the same two people, but one always chooses to share the absolute sweetest, sugar-dripping desserts while the other shares yummy, but health-friendly supper ideas. So, while nutrition is not my area, I think this could tell us something about why someone chooses particular recipes to share. I also think it would helpful to understand how these images impact us; in this example, perhaps how we eat when we see one type of image versus another online. Facebook is only one of several media outlets, such as Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram that would generate this type of data, but is it appropriate for us as professionals to use this type of data to answer research questions?

This research is already occurring, but the debates are still localized in small pockets of human and social sciences. I encourage you to seek out resources such as the Association of online and Internet Researchers (AoIR). This organization has developed a decision-making guide for ethical choices when gathering social media data. I also encourage you to begin this discussion in other professional organizations that you belong to. This way, we can develop innovative, thought provoking research that I think will be fascinating for other professionals to learn from.

References

  1. Ruths, D., & Pfeffer, J. (2014, November 28). Social media for large studies of behavior. Science.
  2. Markham. A., & Buchanan, E. (2012). Ethical decision-making and internet research. Association of Internet researchers, AoIR ethics working committee.

JillPlate

Reposted with permission, jumpWithJill.com

MyPlate was developed by the United State Department of Agriculture in 2010 to illustrate the five food groups that are the building blocks for a healthy diet using a familiar image — a place setting for a meal.

Jump with Jill took this design to heart and created their own version of this tool in their trademark rock & roll style. The plate is a record, the milk coaster is a CD, and the utensils are musical instruments. The record is titled after their song about exercise, The Beat of the Body, to integrate the fitness messaging with the food messaging. Each group is represented by a food featured in the live Jump with Jill show including the naturally sweet watermelon wearing headphonesthe blinded out milk jug who goes by his rapper name “Calcium,” a high protein egg sporting a Jump with Jill snapback, a heart healthy piece of whole grain bread wearing a bow just like Jill, and a carrot dressed as a Superpower Vegetable.

Please use the graphics below for you classroom activities to continue Jump with Jill messages in the classroom.

Print and Color (11 x 17) Print and Laminate (11 x 17)
Plate with Characters
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Plate with Characters
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Just the Plate
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Just the Plate
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Activity Sheet
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National Breakfast Week Gets Going with Jump With Jill Video Release

Reposted with permission. JumpWithJill.com

Participating Fuel Up to Play 60 Schools in Michigan to Receive Dance DVD Produced in Jenison, MI

The world’s only rock & roll nutrition show Jump with Jill is proud to present their hit song about breakfast, Get Me Goin’, as a danceable music video series to launch for National School Breakfast Week March 3 -7, 2014. The series will be given away to 2,500 Fuel Up to Play 60 schools on DVD throughout Michigan and made available at no cost online to all thanks to the generosity of the Michigan Dairy Farmers and Processors and United Dairy Industry of Michigan.

Watch the entire series and download the remixed track for free HERE.

“There is so much data showing that breakfast eaters perform better in school, have better attendance, and visit the school nurse less,” says Jump with Jill creator and video star Jill Jayne, a Registered Dietitian and musician. “As such, school breakfast is federally reimbursable just like school lunch! But the hustle of the morning has made breakfast – this essential and cost-effective meal – into an afterthought. Our job with this video was to make breakfast look and sound irresistible.”

With this charge, the Get Me Goin’ danceable music video was produced at Jenison Middle School in Jenison, MI with local kids and staff. Traditionally uneventful school settings were glorified with backlighting and school meals were prepared from scratch on camera. Isolating the sounds of the cooking compose the sound of the song; A cereal box is a maraca and fruit bowls are agogo bells that build the Latin club feel of the song. Joining the scene of this morning routine is Spanish-speaking Mr. Desayuno, who also happens to be the star of the Michigan cast, DJ Devon Watson. Devon even shaved his head for the role. From the cafeteria, to the classroom, to on-the-go, the video takes you to all the places where you can enjoy a delicious and nutritious breakfast in style.


What is National School Breakfast Week?

  • Eating breakfast helps you jump start your metabolism at the beginning of your day, improves your mood, and gets you ready to learn. Students who eat breakfast every morning have better attendance, visit the school nurse less, get better grades,1 and have a lower BMI.2
  • Schools recognize the connection between breakfast, learning, and body weight, which is why we have the School Breakfast Program in place. It’s federally reimbursable, just like the School Lunch Program.3
  • If you didn’t know that there was a School Breakfast Program as large as the School Lunch Program in schools, well that’s because participation in school breakfast is scarily low. Nationally, less than half of the low-income children who eat lunch at school also participate in breakfast.4
  • The School Nutrition Association created National School Breakfast Week to educate students, parents, and the community about the benefits of healthy school breakfast.
  • In support of National School Breakfast Week, Jill Jayne, the creator of the world’s only rock and roll nutrition show Jump with Jill decided to make the case for breakfast by singing and dancing about it.
  • Jill Jayne is a Registered Dietitian and musician who knows that even free food is not enough to motivate behavior when the meal is competing with morning chaos. Her solution was to create an educational tool that would make breakfast look and sound irresistible.
  • The Get Me Goin’ danceable music video was produced at Jenison Middle School in Jenison, MI with local kids and staff. Traditionally uneventful school settings were glorified with backlighting and school meals were prepared from scratch on camera. Isolating the sounds of the cooking compose the sound of the song; A cereal box is a maraca and fruit bowls are agogo bells that build the Latin club feel of the song. Joining the scene of this morning routine is Spanish-speaking Mr. Desayuno, who also happens to be the star of the Michigan cast, DJ Devon Watson. Devon even shaved his head for the role. From the cafeteria, to the classroom, to on-the-go, the video takes you to all the places where you can enjoy a delicious and nutritious breakfast in style.
  • The series will be given away to 2,500 Fuel Up to Play 60 schools on DVD throughout Michigan and made available online at no cost to all thanks to the generosity of the Michigan Dairy Farmers and Processors and United Dairy Industry of Michigan. Watch the video series at www.jumpwithjill.com/danceparty.

getmegoin430x430_v2

References

1 Food Research and Action Center. Breakfast for Learning. Available at www.frac.org/pdf/breakfastforlearning.pdf
2 Tin SP, Ho SY, Mak KH, Wan KL, & Lam TH (2011). Breakfast skipping and change in body mass index in young children. International journal of obesity, 35 (7), 899-906 PMID: 21448130
3 United States Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service. School Breakfast Program (SBP) website: http://www.fns.usda.gov/sbp/school-breakfast-program-sbp
4 Food Research and Action Center. School Breakfast Scorecard (2009, December). Available at www.frac.org/pdf/breakfast09.pdf

Paraphrasing, Anti-Plagiarism, and Website Credibility Methods

Posted with permission of Zachery Durnell

In a recent field experience at a high school, I had the chance to use and implement two methods at the start of a research paper in a 9th grade Language Arts class.

The first is the CRAP method for website credibility. CRAP stands for Currency, Reliability, Authority and Purpose. Under each of these headings are questions that students can answer to help assess the credibility of a website. This method actually stuck with the students. We all think of CRAP as being a bad thing. In this case a CRAP website is a credible and usable source in a research paper. Continue reading

The Role of Health and Exercise Science in Human Science

By Rebecca A. Hess

At first glance, you might think that the title of this blog insinuates that I am questioning the inclusion of our profession into the most gracious host area, human sciences.  This is not the case, but rather a snapshot view of our related fields and a self-validation of our profession.  As an educator in the area of human movement for over more than thirty years, I have come to wonder, do we know where we have come from, what are hoping to do, and where we want to go from here?  A few years ago, I presented a general panel session titled The Role of Health Science in Honors at the National Collegiate Honors Council Conference (NCHC) in Washington, D.C. with two past honors and Kappa Omicron Nu student athletic training seniors.  My proposed question was to raise the similar issue on academic and personal responsibility.  This information and query is as an extension of that panel topic that will further explore the role of health and exercise science in the human sciences, as well as honors programs which have traditionally focused on development of the humanities.     Continue reading

4 Years of the Cal U – Jamaica Learning Community

By Joni Craymer Roh

Over the past 3 years, KON (Nu Omicron chapter) has worked with the faculty and students in the Nursing Department to deliver distance education to children, young adults and caregivers in Jamaica.  As the title reads: Global Health Through A Learning Community Without Borders, Dr. Cheryl Hetman, RN is the director of the program and is a member of the Nursing Department.  Dr. Hetman has worked closely with Dr. Carol Biddington (KON member — Co Adviser) in the Exercise Science and Sport Studies Department over the years, to deliver various health topics to caregivers in Jamaica.  KON students are asked to specifically present/lecture and demonstrate areas such as contractures, first aid, massage, and range of motion (ROM) to caregivers in Jamaica via distance education.  The bottom 6 photos is a representation of the KON students and staff presenting; and if you look close enough you can see the distance education screen and Jamaicans.  The entire pdf is a poster representing this Service Learning outlining how the evolution has occurred over time and who has been involved with program.  This poster was presented at the Cal U Academic Excellence Days.

Four years ago the group was designed to be a multidisciplinary, multicultural, collaborative Learning Community with a focus on global health, and ultimately, on improving the well-being of hundreds of impoverished, marginalized children and young adults living at Mustard Seed Communities (MSC) mission in various parts of Jamaica. Over the years this program has evolved and expanded to meet the needs of MSC.

View the project presentation (PDF)

Summertime Fun in the Sun

99-Bar Harbor

We are well into the summer months so discard those winter doldrums and get active! To help you get in the mood, we’ve assembled a variety of outdoorsy studies from around the world:

With the advent of digital cameras and camera phones, we have all become amateur photographers. Picturesque peaks and beautiful beaches can be captured with the press of a button, tagged, and shared with others instantly via social media. Researchers, like the ones in a recent PLOS ONE study, can now use this user-generated data—these geo-tagged photographs—to find striking vistas and examine how they correlate with environmental factors, such as soil carbon and farming. These researchers used photos of Cornwall, England, uploaded to Panaramio and plotted them on a map to see where users were taking pictures. Photographs that were clustered together indicated that the area was valued for its aesthetic or visual beauty. As you might think, most clusters were found in beaches and sparsely populated coastal towns. Their findings also suggest that agricultural areas were negatively correlated with aesthetic value.

When looking for your next vacation destination, find somewhere picturesque with clean water. In the US, researchers have studied the effect that water quality may have on recreational activities in the Puget Sound. To do so, they used data from the Washington State Parks to determine how many people entered, camped, or moored in the Puget Sound, starting from the late 1980s to the present day. They then plotted this against fluctuations in Enterococcus, a type of bacteria associated with urinary tract infections and meningitis, in the water. Their findings indicate that an increase of Enterococcus corresponded to a recorded decrease in visitation rates.

Feel like getting involved in the scientific process? You can spend your summer taking part in the citizen science movement and enjoy the great outdoors at the same time. Your contributions may help someone with their research! For example, take this recent PLOS ONE study that uses observational data collected by a Turkish ornithological society. The researchers took recorded sightings of 29 songbird species and combined it with climate data (rainfall and temperature) to develop a model predicting how songbirds may be affected by climate change. The model helped them predict the birds’ distribution in 2020, 2050, and 2080.

Fun can also be found closer to home. For those of you with little ones, there is research to indicate that children’s sedentary behavior can be reduced using a few simple methods. The researchers of this study suggest decreasing the amount of time parents watch TV on the weekend, and instead recommend participating in boys’ sports and encouraging girls to play outside. Their suggestions are based on data collected from participants’ accelerometers over the course of a year. Learn more about this study here.

Citations:

Casalegno S, Inger R, DeSilvey C, Gaston KJ (2013) Spatial Covariance between Aesthetic Value & Other Ecosystem Services. PLoS ONE 8(6): e68437. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0068437

Kreitler J, Papenfus M, Byrd K, Labiosa W (2013) Interacting Coastal Based Ecosystem Services: Recreation and Water Quality in Puget Sound, WA. PLoS ONE 8(2): e56670. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0056670

Abolafya M, Onmuş O, Şekercioğlu ÇH, Bilgin R (2013) Using Citizen Science Data to Model the Distributions of Common Songbirds of Turkey Under Different Global Climatic Change Scenarios. PLoS ONE 8(7): e68037. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0068037

Atkin AJ, Corder K, Ekelund U, Wijndaele K, Griffin SJ, et al. (2013) Determinants of Change in Children’s Sedentary Time. PLoS ONE 8(6): e67627. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0067627

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enterococcus

Image:  99-Bar Harbor by Robert & Pam.